1The Parties undertake to encourage their sports organisations and, through them, international sports organisations to formulate and implement all appropriate measures within their competence in the fight against doping in sport. IADA is an intergovernmental alliance in which national anti-doping agencies are heavily involved. States that approve the Convention regulate their national rules on the World Anti-Doping Code promulgated by the World Anti-Doping Agency. These include facilitating doping controls and supporting national testing programmes; promote the establishment of “good practices” in the labelling, marketing and marketing of products that may contain prohibited substances; reluctance to financially support those who practice or support doping; take measures against production and trafficking in human beings; promote the definition of codes of conduct for professions related to sport and doping; and funding for education and research on drugs in sport. 2The Parties undertake, in cooperation with the relevant regional, national and international sports organisations, to promote and promote research by means of developing scientifically based physiological and psychological training programmes that respect the integrity of the human person. Until the 1990s, agreements between nations to develop uniform approaches to combating the use of performance-enhancing substances were limited to certain sports. The leadership of the International Olympic Committee, which represents the member countries of the Olympic movement, has given impetus to the creation of a global body that would regulate all aspects of anti-doping practice and procedures. (b)”pharmacological classes of doping products or doping methods”, subject to paragraph 2, classes of doping or doping substances prohibited by the international sports organisations concerned and included in lists approved by the monitoring group referred to in Article 11(1.b; IADA was established in 1991 as a Memorandum of Understanding at government level, which sets out the obligation for Member States to pursue and promote cooperatively the fight against doping in sport. Today, the IADA alliance included the governments of Australia, Japan, Canada, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, Norway and the United Kingdom.

The Ministry of Culture represents the official party in the agreement. Through this agreement, the parties commit to strengthen and ensure progress in international anti-doping activities by developing high-quality anti-doping programs at the global level. IADA developed the International Standard for Anti-Doping Controls, which was developed by WADA and became the International Standard for Auditing under the WADA Code. . . .

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